THE ACCOUNTING OFFICES OFJOHN H. GRIESEMER, JR.
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The IRS announced broad-based penalty relief for taxpayers affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The relief applies to failure to file penalties and certain international information return (IIR) penalties with respect to tax returns for tax years (TY) 2019 and TY 2020, filed on or before September 30, 2022.


The IRS has issued guidance to taxpayers, who have inappropriately received forgiveness of their Paycheck Protection Program ('PPP') loan, and has encouraged them to take steps towards compliance, such as filing amended returns that include the forgiven loan amounts, as income.


The IRS has reminded taxpayers to develop emergency preparedness plans due to the upcoming hurricane season and the ongoing threat of wildfires in some parts of the country.


The IRS has released information regarding the pre-screening and certification process for employers taking advantage of the Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC). 


Businesses are still waiting for pandemic relief made available to them during the COVID-19 outbreak amid ongoing processing delays at the Internal Revenue Service, according to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration.


The IRS has released a list of exceptions for the inclusion of a cancelled student loan debt in income. Generally, had a taxpayer's student loan been cancelled or repaid by someone else, the taxpayer was mandated to include the cancelled or repaid loan amount as part of their gross income, for tax purposes. 


Upgrading the Internal Revenue Service’s antiquated information technology infrastructure will help honest taxpayers, especially those making $400,000 or less, from being audited, Department of the Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said.


The IRS continues to ramp-up its work to fight identity theft/refund fraud and recently announced new rules allowing the use of abbreviated (truncated) personal identification numbers and employer identification numbers. Instead of showing a taxpayer's full Social Security number (SSN) or other identification number on certain forms, asterisks or Xs replace the first five digits and only the last four digits appear. The final rules, however, do impose some important limits on the use of truncated taxpayer identification numbers (known as "TTINs").


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